About your Search

20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)
the economies of europe, japan, china, and south korea. next, on booktv. this is a little over an hour.ro ba okay. it is great tock be back at the society. >> for 25 years now, we enjoy a terrific relationship with the a japan society in so manyys wayse ved quudible] bed we have lived quite a bit o time in this is great to be with you let's see, in terms of this whole notion of the book, you know, by the way, it's a very modest title, banker to the world. [laughter] you know, when i heard of this -- and i'm a very close personal friend of bill's, like everybody in this room is, and so when testifies talking to me about this -- when he was talking to me about this concept of what he wanted to write about, lessons of debt cry cease and all of this, i just knew that it was right in our sweet spot in what we needed to be able to do. so we were able to convince him, and so now i'm not talking to you as his friend, i'm talking to you as his publisher. [laughter] and we had this decision, you know, we were going to do this book, and we kid. and we did. now, the ink wasn't even dry on this book when
of europe, japan, china and south korea. next on booktv. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> okay. first of all, it's great to be back at the japan society, and we enjoy our relationship that way. tokyo, for the mcgraw-hill companies, has been the headquarters of our asia pacific operations for 25 years now, and we enjoy a terrific relationship and a lot concern in a lot of different ways. one of many by colleagues is with me, doug peterson, who just joined us from citi, and he is heading up standard & poor's ratings, and we welcome you, doug. and doug has lived with citi all over the world and as such as lived quite a bit of time in japan itself. so it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see, in terms of this whole notion of the book, you know, by the way, it's a very modest title, banker to the world. [laughter] you know, when i heard of this -- and i'm a very close personal friend of bill's, like everybody in this room is, and so when testifies talking to me about this -- when he was talking to me about this concept of what he wanted to write about, lessons of d
challenges facing the economies of europe, japan, china, and south korea. next on book tv. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> okay. first of all, it is great to be back. we enjoyed our relationship that way. tokyo has been the headquarters of our asia-pacific operations for 25 years now. we enjoy a terrific relationship and a lot of different ways. one of my colleagues who is with me, doug peterson who just joined us from the city, and he is setting up. we welcome you, doug. dougie is all over the world. as such, he has lived quite a bit of time in japan himself. it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see. in terms of this whole notion of the book, by the way, a very modest title, banker to the world. when i heard of this, and i am a very close, personal friend of bill's, like everyone in this room is. and so when he was talking to me about this concept of what he wanted to write about to lessons of debt crises and all of this, i just knew that it was right in our sweet spot, what we needed to the will to do. so we were able to convince them. so no i'm not talking
members that include the united states, china, it includes russia. russia is really neither an economic or military superpower except in regards to its nuclear arsenal. and then we have friends and britain and here we have two very much medium powers that are not economic heavyweights, you still exert a great deal of forward and influence in world affairs. a large part of that as leverage they security council itself. we have no india, no brazil, no party from outside this kind of frozen group. and this is, i think, an enormous problem for the security council and one that there's probably no structural way to overcome. the reason why is pretty simple. if you say to any of the current members, why did she set on down, france and britain come you guys had to combine in a single european union fee. and then there's a lot of hemming and hauling it in the meantime, germany pops up and says pet, we are actually one of the world's great economic superpowers. we have no military to speak of and we cannot do anything, but we pay for everything, so we actually deserve a seat. she say we know how
countries-pat spoke with leaders about her husband's upcoming tariff to -- trip to china, explaining he was trying to open a dialogue, and she reiterate america's promise of financial assistance and announced the creation of two grad walt scholarships for women to travel to the united states to study. not her official pronouncements that earned her the accolades, either in the country she visit or back home. it was her warmth, enthusiasm, general win appreciation of and affection for the people she met in monrovia, she said she could not wait to meet people. she did that. she waded into crowds, shaking hands, and giving hugs. at the inauguration ceremony she gave the president a cheek-to-cheek embrace. he called her, quote, woman with strength of spirit and fortitude of character, when a group of women presented her with cloths, rather than just slipping it under her chair, she stood up and began to tie it around her waste. the women got up and came up to help her and dressed her in the traditional clothing. pat's delight in her outfit and her willingness to 0 model spoke volumes out ab
to canada and all the way out through japan and china and korea and the conversation was completely different. was about global trade and freeing trade. and i actually always thought that in that sense the country had more in common with their asian counterparts than their latin american counterparts. it is how they perceive themselves as a state of development and significance there. i think it is because if you look at the places like chile now quite developed in many ways, colombia getting there in terms of the development, a country like brazil was interesting because on the one hand, it is leading the global, one of the leaders in the global economy, but with huge income distribution, difficulties that keep it really more on developing countryside. if you look at some of the poorest countries in the central america like a guatemala for instance, you are talking about places you can't reach the farmers in the high land by the highway, and so their problems are to try to build infrastructure so that they can july and the 20th century economy cannot forget the 21st century economy
, and china has one carrier, that is from the ukrainian navy. i don't know how good they feel about serving in this aircraft carrier, that is exactly what they had. we have over 200 bases and facilities, china has nothing outside of china itself. .. the kid saved a couple hundred billion dollars over the next ten years by reducing that to reasonable 360,000 soldiers. so there are just some of the things that could be done that could get you to that trillion dollars figure that people say would really disarmed the united states. no, it wouldn't. now, 4,807,000,000,000 has already been agreed to by the senate and house of the next ten years of sequestration that would involve another 4,902,000,000,000 which would get you close to trillion, but there won't be a sequestration. so that kind of cutback we will see, and we don't see anyone in the pentagon really working toward this. leon panetta has never really asked for it. so this creates a serious problem. now, demilitarization is a more important issue because what we have done is militarize the entire national security process i have a chapt
our sovereignty said china, the u.s., now canada, even leaders doesn't permit us to monitor. doesn't permit us to report to international body. doesn't permit an international body to tell us what to do with emission. sovereignty has become the obstacle to cooperation and increasely made states look more and more dysfunctional. how is that the most powerful, well equipped military nation in the world has ever seen the united states of america can't bring a handful of terrorists to heal in benghazi or mali, or afghanistan. the asymmetry between a massive military based on big ships, planes, and bombs and the reality of every day -- cross borders that a symmetry means that the war machine, the war machine of the greatest state there ever was is largelier relevant to the security threats we face. as we learn on 9/11 when in this city, a handful of hijackers living in the united states for years hijacked our planes and turned them to weapons. they didn't have to be given weapons by anyone. they seize them and use them and created devastation here. that, again, is a sign of this new asy
percentage of products come from the developing world especially china and walmart and these food processors and grain traders were the biggest proponents of globalizing the food system. they find it advantageous to process, grow food where it is cheaper in countries where environmental laws are weaker and they have an easier time dictating policy and increasingly our foods are being produced in these countries and if you are talking about organics it is very difficult to verify in the u.s. that organic products are meeting standards so we can imagine how this is happening in places like china. basically what we are advocating and the reason i wrote "foodopoly" is that we need to do more, it is great that the local foods movement is valuable. i have a farm, we love our farm, we love people coming out but we don't envision that our farm or the farmers' markets in the d.c. area will never be able to feed the entire population because you have to be able to focus these products and these grocery stores and the distribution chains have a stranglehold so we need to add antitrust law to our good f
or the power in the world so they include the united states, china, and includes russia but russia is neither an economic or military superpower accept in regards to its use nuclear arsenal. then we have france and britain, and here we have the median of powers that are not economic heavyweights in the world and yet still exert a great deal of force in the world affairs a great deal of influence on world affairs but a large part of that is actually a leveraged by the security council itself. we have no india, we have no prez sell -- brazil, no party outside of this kind of frozen grouper and this is i think again the enormous problem for the security council and no structural way to overcome. the reason why is pretty simple. why don't you step on down. there is a lot and in the meantime germany pops up and says we are one of the world's greatest economic superpowers and we can't do anything from the marshall standpoint but we pay for everything so we deserve a seat we dhaka the military either we should have a seat because we are an economic superpower and some very powerful country which say
, especially fingerpointing in china and other countries. in this chapter i basically emphasized that other countries, do as i say, not as i did. and from the very good go america's motive industrialization was not focusing first on domestic innovation, but actually aggressive, widespread, enthusiastic, overt theft of european, especially british technologies. alexander hamilton was the most enthusiastic proponent, aulos official state policy, the need to go out and do this. interestingly enough another brown brother has a crucial role year, not john brown, the bad brother, the slave trader, the property from the war, but denies brown brother, the quaker, the pacifist, the abolitionist, moses brown. moses brown hired samuel slater. simulator is considered the grandfather of the american industrial revolution. he has been credited. prole in overstatement. but cut it would appeal any side and he will be credited to my tab forever in history. well, who? the smuggle himself in the fines of extraordinary strict british innovation loss that did not allow machinists skilled artisans like insult to
to acknowledge its discriminations in tibet or in western china against the uyghur people. many nations hide from their past but we owe people the truth. we owe them their history and we owed them repair and we are not doing that. not only that, we don't even want to talk about it as a society. >> host: you say that this loss of heritage is comparable to the holocaust and some of the other genocides. >> guest: the holocaust was 12 years. this was 246 years plus the century that people lost where they lost their languages. they. they lost their culture, they lost everything. many people had their severed. people lost their tongues. thomas jefferson when he was a boy at two years old had a relationship with a 14-year-old girl, sally hammonds, that he owned and wasn't from the -- we know what it would be called today. that was routine. we lost any idea of who we were. it was our past, our memory was banished and we worked ourselves to an early death. rebuilt the capital, built the white house, and doubt harvard law school which was endowed by isaac royal from the proceeds and the sale of slaves that
shock when he saw with the final cost will be. 11 aircraft carriers and task force china has one carrier and that is from the ukraine navy i don't know how they feel about serving on this aircraft carrier but that is what they have. they have over 200 bases and facilities nothing outside of china itself. the marines are larger and more powerful than the british military. when is the last time they conducted the landing the degette a lot of their support for? 1951, the courier and war that they had, they were talking about an expeditionary fighting vehicle. they are getting enough 35 and that is another thing about what we do. every service has its own air force so in addition, you have the army, the navy, the marine corps that has their own capability in terms of the air force. finally, you have the army structure at 547,000. you could save a couple hundred billion dollars over the next ten years by reducing that to a reasonable 360,000. so those are just some of the things that could be done that could get you to the trillion dollar figure that some people would say would disarm the uni
believe down to your core that the u.s. will be there, that does more to deter war with china, and all other party than anything else. the moment you believe the u.s. didn't believe the own even symbolic statements you start thinking about that much harder. i would say the class between the new liberal realist and the idealist within the obama administration has been fantastically costly to the u.s.' long-term position. not because the realism is wrong because it's realism that believes it can have if all ways. have the cake and eat it too. it can say whatever it wants and ignore opportunity road. >> host: what is your background? >> guest: a law professor hered at american university. i teach a combination of both business law and actually don't really teach international law courses and public international law. i'm a visiting fellow at the hoover institution in california and a nonresidence senior fellow here at the brookings institution in washington, d.c. mostly national security. the book i'm proud to say was published by the hoover institution press. and i have a background that
public schools china and india 220 days of instruction and in the united states it is only 180 days? that is drastic between china and india 40 +-- per year if you multiply that kindergarten through 12th grade it is a big disadvantage. >> guest: people say what do we need to save the education? in my opinion you have to put every single resource there and it is the resources of time. if you look at the schools in this country whether traditional, a charter schools, they are in school more and have their kids working and after school and on weekends we are still living on the agrarian calendar. literally it is interesting somebodies said on a talk show the other day or applaud that said the u.s. is not doing worse than what it was doing before but she is right when you looked at the fact academic achievement levels of the kids in the '60s and '70s is pretty much on par with where we are today. it is true from that vantage point* we're not worse but the problem is there are countries that are leapfrog ahead of fiat the head of west lafayette and liechtenstein are both growing two or t
in two nay and the china diary of george h.w. bush, making of the global president published by princeton university press in 2008. the whole reform with one of our manufacturers with the strategic studies institute and 20 times and he wrote to follow the berlin while the revolutionary legacy of 1989, published by oxford university press in 2009. obviously a mission that the bush school, but it we know he's doing well asset me. i would now like to suggest are going to have a reintroduction to dr. jeff said are you coming up on stage. before he brings his earmarks were going to see a video and this is a pretty significant video because its video in president bush's own words and it chronicles the events following the invasion of kuwait. i would take you now to pay attention to this video and after it's over, we'll have just single, contact to us. thank you very much. [applause] >> in the early-morning hours of august at akkad, following negotiations and promises iraq's dictator, saddam hussein not to use force, a powerful iraqi army invaded it stressed and much weaker neighbor, kuwait. wit
don't pay them what they're worth. >> in australia they have 200 days of public school. in china and india, it's 220 days of public school instruction. in the united states, why do you think in the united states it's only 180 days? which is drastically, if you take between china and india, it's 40 less days a year, and if you multiply that from -- >> [inaudible] >> through 12th grade and stuff, it's a big advantage. >> so it's no wonder they're kicking our butts. i mean, it really isn't. you know, people all the time talk about, well, what do we need in order to fix education in and in my opinion you have to put every single resource to bear to solve this problem. and the resource that people underestimate is the resource of time. and i think that if you look at the schools in this country that do the best whether they be traditional public schools, charter schools, etc., they are in school more time. they have their kids working before school, after school, on weekends, etc. , and we have 180-day calendar because we're still living off the agrarian calendar. i mean, literally, i
, a high percentage of products come from the developing world, especially china. wal-mart and he said processors and grain traders for the biggest proponent of globalizing the food system. they find it advantageous to process, to grow food rates cheaper countries in countries with environmental laws are weaker, where they can have an even easier time to teaching policies. and so, increasingly foods are being produced in the country. and if are talking about organic, it's difficult to verify in the u.s. that organic products are meeting the standards. so we can imagine how this is happening in places like china. >> up next,
intellectual property theft debate, finger-pointing at china and other countries. i basically emphasize is do is they say, not as they did and from the get-go, america's mode of industrialization was not focusing first on domestic innovation, but aggressive widespread enthusiastic over past, especially british technologies. alexander hamilton was the most enthusiastic upon it, almost official state policy to go out and do this. interestingly enough, in other brown brother has a crucial role here. not john brown the bad rather come the slave trader, profiteer, but the nice brother, the quaker, pacifists, abolitionists. how did mrs. brown play a role here? he hired samuel slater. they are considered the grandfather of the american industrial revolution. probably an overstatement, but go to wikipedia and he will be credited. he actually smuggled himself out of england in defiance of extraordinarily strict british immigration laws that did not allow machine has come artisan precisely because if he did would end up helping countries other than england. smuggled himself to new york. heard about him
to places they can have china and initially people in india and china didn't know how to do the work while. for having a really difficult time getting those jobs back. they make a mistake of that magnitude. markets are constantly making this tape and correction processes, but they never make the mistake of that magnitude. it takes government policy to create that the state. in this case a three bit culprits, the fdic in government housing policy. a fundamental context are the root cause argued made by the federal reserve. something many people know, but don't get what it means. in 1913 the federal reserve is created, the monetary system is nationalized. there is no private monetary system. if you have problems in the monetary system, what this financial crisis is about, by definition the government policy profits. it's the other state highway bridges are falling down from me say that bridges are falling down on the government's problem. that's exactly true with monetary bridges falling down. the federal reserve is created in theory to reduce volatility in the economy. and practice what the
there in china trying to make sure that the chinese government understands that what we sell books, when we bring books to china that they're going to do -- they're going to do at least everything they can to make sure they're not being stolen, pirated, copied. the department of energy, that was one of the three. the department of energy regulates oil and gas. so if you eliminate that department what happens? the department of education funds about 12% of u.s., the u.s. -- kate as 12 additional. you eliminate education. what happens? those were the questions that should have been asked of rick perry because those are the questions that might break through the difference is the people have as to whether or not the local of the federal government is too big. receptacle eliminated department and those assembly of a role to play in education. but it is that data, that evidence that is, i think, really, really quite important. now, with that said -- obama let me go back one second. caring about consequences. what i mean there is really, that's more about health care than anything else. is 50 million p
know now because of the work we do in the book publishing industry they are over there in china trying to make sure the chinese government understands when we sell books and bring books to china they are going to do everything they can to make sure they are not being piloted and copied and sold somewhere else. the department of energy was one of those. the department of energy regulates oil and gas drilling so if you eliminate the department, what happens to redefault percent of the case through 12 educational system eliminates the department of education what happens? those were the questions that should have been asked of rick perry because those were the questions that might break through the difference is other people have as to whether or not the federal government is too big we have to eliminate the problem and those say we have a way in education but it is really quite important. caring about consequences. what i mean it's more about health care than anything else is 50 million people uninsured not to come up with a plan to deal with that seems to be an unbelievable acceptance o
he wrote sitting in a cave in northern china after the long march, working so intently that he didn't notice that a fire from a candle was burning a hole in his sock. and what mao emphasized is has ea famously -- he famously said, the people are like wear water, and the army is like fish. he said it was essential to keep the closest possible relations with the common people, that a guerrilla force had to be extremely cognizant of earning the support of the public upon whom-operating. he gave instructions to his soldiers to be courteous and polite and establish latrines a safe distance from people's houses. now believe me, this was not something the huns worried about thousands of years before. their idea of public relations was simply killing as many people as they possibly could as gruesomely as they possibly could. but mao understand in this new age you had to pay attention to public opinion, and that's something that has been incredibly influential ever since. it's especially been influential, even more so, with terrorist organizations. because terrorism as the anarchists said in
of america's most notorious mob boss." in "china goes global," david shambaugh from george washington university examines china's growing economic influence in the global marketplace. marguerite hold toway, director of science at columbia university, recalls the life of john randall jr. in "the measure of manhattan: the tumultuous career and surprising legacy of john randall jr. " look for these titles in bookstores this coming week and watch for the authors in the near future on booktv and on booktv.org. >> visit booktv.org to watch any of the programs you see here online. type the author or book title in the search bar on the upper left side of the page and click search. you can also share anything you see on booktv.org easily by clicking share on the upper left side of the page and selecting the format. booktv streams live online for 48 hours every weekend with top nonfiction books and authors. booktv.org. >> tell us what you think about our programming this weekend. you can tweet us @booktv, comment on our facebook wall or send us an e-mail. booktv, nonfiction books every weekend
of commerce is over there in a china trying to make sure the chinese government understands when we sell books, when we bring books to china, they will do everything they can to make sure they are not being sold or pirated or copied or sold somewhere else. the department of energy, that was one of the three. the department of energy regulates oil and gas drilling. if you eliminate that department, what happens? the department of education funds 12% of the u.s. k-12 educational system. the department of education, what happens? those were the questions that should have been asked of rick perry because those are the questions that might break through the differences people have, the federal government is too big, eliminate the department and those who say we have a role to play in education but it is that data, that evidence that are really quite important. with that said -- let me go back one second. caring about consequences. what i mean is it is more about health care than anything else. fifty million people uninsured or close to fifty million people uninsured not to come of a plan to deal wi
, considering the region. china on one side, india the south, russia to the north. united states can't just pack up and walk away. but are we able to convince the people there, our local hosts and potential allies, that we need to be there? that is the question. and that is where i believe there has been a failure. >> host: but we are -- our footprint is going to be much smaller after 2014. >> guest: that's a choice we're making and i'm not entirely happy. i would like a different kind of footprint. if you had conditionals like the one i went to, which is a university now, and they open -- if you had ten of these, throughout the tribal areas, think of the impact. think of the future generation, in one stroke you're changing the direction of a nation. if we value education, knowledge, law, a compassionate civil society, we must understand, peter so do the irans and pakistanis. we must try to convey this to them. not to suggest that soldiers and guns and missiles and drones because that will immediately have locals resisting. so the paradigm has to be thought out and that can only be thought out i
, by the way, this trend is not just happening in our country. it's in europe, japan, and it's also in china, and in india. you may have heard of the chinese company called fox con that makes the smart phone and digital devices. they announced over the next three years, they are installing one million robots. now, these young chinese men and women who have migrated in such large numbers from the impoverished rural areas of china from the centers of manufacturing, closer to the export terminals, what are they going to do when they compete with these row -- robots, and the robots get smarter and the algorithms and thinking machines get smarter all the time. moore's law, which everybody knows about, making the computers twice as fast every 18-24 months for the same dollar. you don't have to keep going in that pattern for very long before they get in much smarter than they are now, and they are now beginning to take on tasks that we have always assumed would remain the unique province of our species. we are talking now about economic policies in our country that represent a pattern that really i
in china did not know how to do that work very well. we are having a very difficult time giving those jobs back. markets never make a mistake of that magnitude. it takes government policy to create a mistake. in this case we did call the fdic and government housing and the fundamental context, the real problem is made by the federal reserve. some people don't get what it means. the monetary system of the united states was nationalized and there is no private monetary system. the government owns monetary system. if you're having problems in the monetary system, which is what this crisis is about, this is the definition of government policy problems. if interstate highway bridges were falling down, that is the governments problem. the government owns the monetary system that's what the federal reserve does. so was created in theory. in practice, what they do is increase problems in the long term in a free market. markets are constantly corrected. the failing process is actually as important as the creation process. this cannot be redirected and when you stop the downside correction all you d
or the bomb or another country or china. the greatest threat to american security will simply be an individual or a small group who is determined to die for their cause. you don't have to evoke 9/11 to see what the damage will be or if you look at assassins they could be divided into categories. hunters and howlers. howlers make a lot of noise and they call it on threats and they intend to kill us but the good news is they rarely take action. the hunters are different. hunters clock, plan and execute but here's what fascinating. hunters have almost no interest in howling and howlers have almost no interest in hunting and if you look at the for assassins all four of them are hunters. that means the secret service who i have so much respect for further training facility in maryland it means the person they are looking for is the person who they will never see coming. that is a scary thought. along with assassins the funniest part of it is the guy who took me into this museum the guy who has all the body parts he was in the front row so he is there and i'm like here's the guy. he gave me the brai
to be russia or the bomb or china or whatever, and they figured out, ten and 20 years from now, the greatest threat to american security will be an individual or small group that is determined to die for their cause, and you don't have to invoke 9/11 to see what the damage can be. when you look at assassins they kinded into hunters and howlers, and howlers make a lot of noise and call in bomb threats and say they're going to kill us, but they rarely take action. the hunters are very different. hunters plot and plan and execute. but here's what is fascinating. hunters have almost no interest in howling, howlers have almost no interest in hunting, if you look at the four assassins, all for of them are hunters and that mean the seek vet service would who i have so much respect for, took me to their train facility in maryland. means the person they're looking for is the person who they'll never see coming. right? that's a scary thought. and along with assassins -- the funniest part of -- always the funniest part of the assist sin is the guy who took me into his museum, who has all the body parts
overseas to places like india and china. initially the people did know how to do that work for a while. for having a really difficult time getting those jobs that. how did we make a mistake of that magnitude? that is a really big error. they never make a mistake of that magnitude. he takes government policy to create that mistaken in this case it through the culprits are the federal reserves, fdic in government housing policy. in a fundamental context, the real cause our errors made by the federal reserve cut a something many people know but don't get what it means. in 1813 the federal reserve is created, the monetary system is nationalized. there is no private monetary system. if you're having problems in the monetary system, with this financial crisis is about, by definition their government policy problems. if the interstate highway bridges are falling down, you see the bridges are falling down and that's the government problem. that is true with monetary bridges falling down. that's what the federal reserve does. the federal reserve was created in theory to reduce volatility. in pr
believe the chinese are the most hyper ambassador of any in china today. so popular that some members of the current think he is -- the chinese government thinks he's too popular. and he's a good friend of terri's, and also of mind. so i would hope to see more of that going forward. >> at the time of the formation of the euro, the three-tier euro was considered but not adopted. and an unfortunate result of this has been the mediterranean countries so largely dependent on tourism has become -- they are really not competitive. is it time to reconsider the three-tier euro in that important affair would be a very substantial devaluation of the mediterranean countries, and that should result in job growth, economic growth simply from increased tourism? >> i think it's fair to say that historically, i talk about latin america, and als also about the asian financial crisis, korea, as an example, indonesia also, is that one of the great age they had was the ability to devalue. and what do we have? we have euro at one of its strong points today, which is one of the reasons why i'm an advocate
a chapter on afghanistan and on china, i talk about russia. india. i talk about america's competitive position in the world, where we are, what the challenges are for us, but also the world. i talk about alliances. i talk about the need to reconnect with public service. i have always believed that there is no nobler profession than public service. we havety myished that -- diminished that over a generation in a sense how many politicians have you heard make fun of government employees or diminish many some way -- in some way or make offhanded comments about washington is the bane of our existence, nothing good happens in washington. only the good, smart people are in nebraska or california or ohio. [laughter] you say that for political advantage occasionally, but unfortunately, that has permeated a society of young people who have been conditioned in many ways. and i think of what we are going to need and what joseph nye first wrote about from harvard in 1990. and he was, joseph nye was before our foreign relations committee along with richard armitage, and they were co-chair of a com
cold war. published by stanford university press in 2008. and the china die a of george h.w. bush, the making of a global president, published by princeton university press in 2008. rethinking leadership and whole of government national security reform, with one of our bush school faculty members, joe serami, and that was done for the strategic studies institute in 2010, and wrote the fall of the berlin wall, the revolutionary legacy of 1989, published by oxford university press in 2009. obviously we miss him at the bush school but know he is doing well at smu. i would now like to suggest that we're going to have a preintroduction to dr. jeff engel coming up on stage, and before he brings his remarks we're going to see a video, and this is a pretty significant video because it's a video in president bush's own words and it chronicles the event following the invasion of kuwait, and i would like to now pay attention to this video and after it's over, we'll have jeff engel come up and talk to us. thank you very much. [applause] >> in the early morning hours of august 2nd, following n
, russia invading western europe. if there's a war with china, ir don't see it being a ground war, at least not with us involved. president obama and secretary panetta and the joint chiefs of staff in their strategy reviewne oftt a year ago which is the mot attention to that was the pivote from europe to the pacific, one thing in that review that wasn't so well noted was the idea that it's kind of an end of nation building. he said the army and marines shall not size its forces for large-scale, prolonged stability operations which translated to english is like no more iraqs and afghanistans. not just no more iraqs and afghanistans, but when you do your scenarios, when you crank your calculations to figure out how many troops you need, thiss is not even the kind of scenario that should enter into the calculation. and as you say, the small stuff is mainly special forces. some people, including john nogle, have proposed setting up a special advise and assist, you know, soldiers who would be specialists in being advisers to overseas armies. and i think that is what a lot of the army is doing no
was there to train -- work with the nun nungs, who were special forces from china, o work with the mountain yards wo were the native population and there and work with south vietnamese regular forces who, none of them were as gung ho as the americans. >> he was captured in 1964 and released after nine years, when? >> in march 16, 1973. so, 10 days short of nine yars. >> for purposes after the introduction, we -- in 1973, he comes back to the united states. we're talking about 1991, his son standing trial for murder. why? >> jim -- jim jr. was born the day after jim was shot down. alice had made a decision about 15 months later to move the family in with another man to pose as thehusband of this other man to sort of put her life with jim thompson behind her. the reason shedidthat were numerous, but her support system was breaking down. alice was the kind of woman who was very dependent uon her husband. there were some problems in the marriage, but nothing that jim thought about much while he was in captivity because he idolized the marriage and the family. it was his dream to get home. but from alice
have our membership is worldwide, and that is part of the u.s. if you look in areas like china, there could be up to $30 billion of cap ex funds. even here in the united states, we are still seeing growth. there is no slowing down. there is this insatiable hunger for full capacity in the cable industry. being able to choose a provider of choice to provide those services. >> host: when you look 10 years down the road, how will people be viewing video over tv? >> guest: the role of the second screen in your living room, having a remote control, now you are seeing this as a device shipped. i have it in my living room, but i want to see it out and about. it's a way the way that consumers want to enjoy the content. they want to see the content that they want. so i think you will see a shift in what the concept is and what device they want to enjoy it on. >> host: about a year ago, you publish your first book, beyond the obvious. >> guest: i'm a believer that creativity and innovation is not a gift. it's a skill that anyone can learn and be good at. everyone can benefit from it. even
the highest rate of incarceration and the world with even highly repressive regimes like russia or china or iran but this cannot be explained by crime or crime rates. no. during the same period of time that our incarceration rates increased exponentially, crime rates fluctuate, went up, down, back up again, down again, and today as bad as they are in many parts of the country, nationally the crime rates are at historical lows. but incarceration rates at historic the sword. most criminologists and sociologists today will lead knowledge crime and acceleration rates in the united states have moved independently of one another. incarceration rates especially black incarceration rates have soared regardless whether the crime is going up or down in any given community or the nation as a whole. what explains the sudden explosion in incarcerations? the birth of the system unprecedented in world history sent crime and crime rates well the answer is the war on drugs and the get-tough move meant the way the putative mess that washed over the united states. drug convictions alone accounted for about
contingent fee. these are strong, powerful and resonant themes in machiavelli. for china does not preach resignation. there's not a line of transit nation in machiavelli's writing. politicians, in other words were people in charge of public affairs and cannot predict the unprotect bowl. they can't be sure when the arno is going to flow, but they can put it takes, they can put it dan's and persuade fellow citizens to take action to do what they can to mitigate the impact of fortune, and the impact they say. they can't prevent the worst, but they can channel the flood downstream. mitigate harms, and seek to control for chin to to jack reid a kid. the chapter ends with the notorious passage about fortune being a woman. it is a violent passage, an a passage. other passages in machiavelli make it clear he had pretty formidable leaseback as it happens, for women as political actors. but the metaphor is fair to say, well, human will, masculine will can control beyond project will, do not have to submit to fate and contingency and chance with pious resignation. and so, that's each unanimously im
press in 2008, and "the china diary of george h. w. bush" published by princeton university press in 2008. we think in leadership and whole of government national security reform, one of our bush school faculty members, and that was done for the strategic studies institute in 2010. and he wrote "the fall of the berlin wall," published by oxford university press in 2000. obviously, we miss him at the bush school but we know he's doing well at the smu. i would now like to suggest that we're going to have a preproduction to doctor jeff engel coming up on stage, and before he brings his remarks, we are going to see a video. is a pretty significant to you because it's a video in president bush's own words, and it chronicles events followed the invasion of kuwait, and i would like you now to pay attention to this video, and after it's over, we'll have jeff engel, then talk with us. thank you very much. [applause] >> in the early morning hours of august 2, following negotiations and promises by iraq's dictator, saddam hussein, not to use force, a powerful iraqi army invaded its trusting
the -- worldwide, not just the u.s. in china there's estimationings there's going to be $30 billion spent in the cable industry alone over the next five years. even here in the u.s., we're still seeing growth. if you look at the growth rate in data usage from subscribers from cable data services, we're seeing anywhere from 30, 40, 50% rates on an annual basis, and there's no slowing down. so there's just this insatiable hunger for more capacity, faster or speeds. and so the cable industry has a long, long future in being able to be that provider of choice for those services. >> host: when you look ten years down the road, how are people going to be viewing video, viewing tv? same way they are today? >> guest: no. i think you're seeing that shift already. the role of the second screen in a living room, what -- in five years from now, what's the concept of a channel? you know, today we think of channels as this linear up/down on your remote control. hold up how -- how many of us wh linear television in realtime? we've kind of gotten into this time hiv shifting model. i may record it on my d
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)